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Komiza, a 12th-century fishing port built by Benedictine monks around a deep natural bay at the base of Mount Hum on the western shore of Vis.

Komiza, a 12th-century fishing port built by Benedictine monks around a deep natural bay at the base of Mount Hum on the western shore of Vis.

Winding down along Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast through bays and inlets, along rocky shores and around countless islands offers a feast for the eyes and the palate. Croatia has more than 1,000 miles of coastline and 1,200-plus islands, the largest archipelago in the Adriatic. About 50 of the islands have populations that make for some of the most historic, interesting and picturesque ports of call in the world.

The entrance to the gothic Augubio Palace of the ennobled merchant Giovianni Battista De Gubbio from the 15th century. This ornate doorway lies inside the walls of Diocletian’s Palace, a well-preserved Roman structure in Split, dating back to the fourth century. 

The entrance to the gothic Augubio Palace of the ennobled merchant Giovianni Battista De Gubbio from the 15th century. This ornate doorway lies inside the walls of Diocletian’s Palace, a well-preserved Roman structure in Split, dating back to the fourth century. 

Jumping off from Split, the largest city on the Dalmatian Coast, it’s usually a comfortable run out to the islands of Brac, Hvar and Vis, with their typical calm seas and mild temperatures. The beautiful ports have historic stone structures and red tile roofs that create a colorful, welcoming waterfront scene. Med-style docking, stern to the stone cay, is common in many ports for vessels up to 100 feet and longer. Larger islands offer several ports, each with its own vibe.

An appetizer of freshly caught tuna with local ingredients presented atop a sea urchin by the chef of Navilux.undefined

An appetizer of freshly caught tuna with local ingredients presented atop a sea urchin by the chef of Navilux.undefined

The water is every bit as clear, blue and delicious as the Caribbean. You can enjoy a swim off the yacht in a secluded cove in the afternoon and then head out to an island vineyard for a world-class wine tasting experience. The weather is stunning: light breezes with abundant sun during the day, and a pleasant cooling off in the evening. From a quiet night at anchor in the sheltered cove at Pakleni Island, you can stroll the peaceful waterfront in historic Stari Grad, or enjoy a lively bar with good music and an enthusiastic clientele in Hvar. Fall asleep on deck under the stars, or dance that night away.

Stripping the paint from an old fishing boat in the fishing village of Vrboska, on the island of Hvar. 

Stripping the paint from an old fishing boat in the fishing village of Vrboska, on the island of Hvar. 

If variety is the spice of life, then cruising Croatia’s Dalmatian coast is a feast. 

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE, GLOBAL REACH

The experience aboard the 122-foot (37-meter) Navilux and 160-foot (49-meter) Acapella was superb in every way. Charter providers Otium Yachts in Croatia, and CharterWorld, an international firm, both have strong reputations for customer service, extensive knowledge of the region and strong relationships with Croatian yacht owners.

A cyclist pedals through the ancient narrow winding streets of Vis. Croatia has both continental and Mediterranean climates. Vineyards and olive groves are plentiful with lemons, mandarins, figs and almonds to the south. 

A cyclist pedals through the ancient narrow winding streets of Vis. Croatia has both continental and Mediterranean climates. Vineyards and olive groves are plentiful with lemons, mandarins, figs and almonds to the south. 

For more information: otiumyachts.com, charterworld.com  

This article was originally published in the Winter 2022 issue.

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