Isaac Spares Trinity Yachts

Almost seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and floods forced out many residents, Hurricane Isaac rolled in. The downpours that accompanied the storm soaked the Gulf Coast once more, but this time the results were different. Low-lying rural areas were flooded once more but New Orleans stayed mostly dry.
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Almost seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and floods forced out many residents, Hurricane Isaac rolled in. The downpours that accompanied the storm soaked the Gulf Coast once more, but this time the results were different. Low-lying rural areas were flooded once more but New Orleans stayed mostly dry.

Almost seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and floods forced out many residents, Hurricane Isaac rolled in. The downpours that accompanied the storm soaked the Gulf Coast once more, but this time the results were different. Low-lying rural areas were flooded once more but New Orleans stayed mostly dry.

TrinityYachts-NewOrleansYard

Seven years ago, Trinity Yachts was forced out of its New Orleans shipyard and moved hundreds of its workers to temporary shelters in a shipyard it acquired in nearby Gulfport, Miss. This year, the news is much better for Trinity. Although both locations were affected—Trinity’s New Orleans yard was in the direct path of Isaac and its Gulfport shipyard was hit by a tropical storm that produced a nine-foot storm surge—a release stated, “There was no damage to the Gulfport yard or to any of the yachts and other vessels under construction.” The Gulfport yard returned to work on August 31. The New Orleans yard took a direct hit. “The recently completed floodgates protecting the city of New Orleans did their job (...) Despite a storm surge of 11 feet, the shipyard is located inside of the new levee protection system and only had about 18 inches of water come over the bulkheads, which is not a problem for the shipyard,” the release continued.

There was little damage to the yard itself, which was to resume work when power was restored to the city of New Orleans. The 164-foot Trinity Mia Elise, which was moored at shipyard for regular maintenance, suffered no damage, thanks to Captain Ron Wood, who “did a great job preparing the yacht for the approaching storm.”

For more info, see trinityyachts.com

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