Making Waves: Delta Marine's Project Invader Comes Together

During a recent visit to Delta’s immaculate shipyard near downtown Seattle, we had the opportunity to see Project Invader in the assembly hall. This 138-foot-8-inch (66-meter) yacht is slated for a spring 2013 delivery; a schedule that promises to keep the Delta team on its toes.
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During a recent visit to Delta’s immaculate shipyard near downtown Seattle, we had the opportunity to see Project Invader in the assembly hall. This 138-foot-8-inch (66-meter) yacht is slated for a spring 2013 delivery; a schedule that promises to keep the Delta team on its toes.

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The beamy Project Invader may look classical, but her construction is innovative, combining an ice-class steel hull with a composite superstructure. The two parts were built simultaneously to allow the shipyard to meet her aggressive build schedule. Putting them together made for quite a production. First, the 800-ton steel hull was floated from Delta’s metal hull facility down the Duwamish Waterway on a barge to the shipyard’s main assembly hall. Then, the entire 138,000-pound superstructure was lifted by cranes (it took three of them) and fitted atop the steel hull.

This is not Delta’s first time combining steel with composites (that is how Laurel was built), but the combination remains rare in private yachts. The Delta Design Group’s use of composites not only helps keep the overall weight down, but it also allows for the creation of nice sculpted shapes. Project Invader, which is being built to Lloyd’s Register and LY2, will have a range of 5,000 nautical miles at 12 knots. We are looking forward to seeing her high-volume interior, featuring a traditional design by Diane Johnson Design with Johnson, Wen, Mulder & Associates, when she launches next year.

For more information, visit deltamarine.com

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