Yacht Review: Sanlorenzo 86

The Sanlorenzo 86 has smart design elements and memorable interior styling.

By Chris Caswell

sanlorenzo-30Walking through the Sanlorenzo 86, I found something to like in every area of the yacht. The salon: huge. The dining area: most civilized. The galley: for chefs. The accommodations: purloined from the Ritz.

Judging by this new model, it’s no wonder that the builder, founded in 1958, holds firmly to its boutique approach. Sanlorenzo Americas, led by industry veteran George Jousma, helps tailor the models to North American sensibilities while Fort Lauderdale interior designer Marty Lowe brings delightful finishing touches.

The boat I sea-trialed was bright and cheerful, with a spacious salon perfect for entertaining. Glossy white lacquer overhead and oversized windows added to the feeling of spaciousness. The woodwork was whitewashed oak, along with the distressed salon sole planking. Everything—bulkheads, cabinets, fabrics and the stitched leather countertops—was appealing in both the visual and tactile senses. Forward, a formal dining area seated eight at a square table, which lets everyone converse compared with longer tables that keep guests at more of a distance.

The focal point of the salon, and one that I couldn’t help but touch, was the forward bulkhead: a huge panel of hand-carved Carrara marble backlit with an LED film that illuminated the entire surface without dark spots. It was the perfect backdrop for dining, and a serene pleasure to view.

White lacquer and large windows make the salon bright and airy.

White lacquer and large windows make the salon bright and airy.

The focal point of the salon is a backlit Carrara marble panel on the bulkhead.

The focal point of the salon is a backlit Carrara marble panel on the bulkhead.

Another bit of eye candy was the staircase to the upper deck. A thick glass panel makes it appear that the stair steps are floating in space. The design adds to the feeling of openness while being another “wow” design element for guests.

A thick glass panel makes it appear that the stair steps are floating in space.

A thick glass panel makes it appear that the stair steps are floating in space.

The galley is in the pilothouse, which can be closed off from the salon. It’s country-style, with a dinette for four under the pilothouse window for casual meals. In pale oak and white mica, the galley, which has room for two to work, has a double-door Sub-Zero fridge, stainless sink with drying board, and four-burner Miele cooktop with convection oven. A pantograph door opens to the starboard deck for loading provisions or for crew access without tramping through the salon.

Galley and helm are separated from the salon.

Galley and helm are separated from the salon.

Under the clear staircase to the bridge are the stairs to the lower foyer, a space that Lowe lined with carved “bricks” of leather. The full-beam master suite aft has stainless-framed windows, a bureau and a headboard made of similar leather bricks. Many yachtbuilders place the master head abaft the stateroom, but the Sanlorenzo 86 has it to starboard. Two sliding smoked glass doors close it if desired, and there is a separate door for the toilet. Twin sinks are under the windows, and the shower is lined with a mosaic of dark glass. (Owners of this Sanlorenzo can be forgiven for telling guests, “Hey, you have to come see our shower!”) A walk-in closet is finished in pale oak, showing the builder’s attention to detail.

The full-beam master suite aft has stainless-framed windows, a bureau and a headboard made of leather bricks.

The full-beam master suite aft has stainless-framed windows, a bureau and a headboard made of leather bricks.

Forward along the companionway are two guest staterooms, each with twin berths, full windows and ensuite heads with shower stalls. Farther forward, the VIP stateroom is another departure, with an athwartships berth that breaks from the usual island berth stuffed in the bow. In the Sanlorenzo 86, the crew quarters are in the bow, leaving the area from the engine room to the transom as a garage for a 12-foot tender. And if you’re thinking the VIP arrangement forces owners to give up something, au contraire: A head with shower is forward along with an oversized hanging locker.

I found even more to like on the flybridge. This 86 had the hardtop on a raked forward buttress. You can also get a more conventional aft arch, but don’t do it. This is the one. First, it complements the lines of the yacht, making it look like she’s going 50 knots while anchored. Second, it has the sunroof of all sunroofs: a series of electrically controlled slats that pivot to allow sun and air, or that close for protection. (Forgive them: “After you’ve seen our shower, you have to see our sunroof!”)

The bridge has a dining table for eight and a sun roof integrated in the hardtop.

The bridge has a dining table for eight and a sun roof integrated in the hardtop.

The rest of the bridge has a dining table for eight, which Lowe made elegant with Paola Lenti rope chairs, plus a counter to starboard with stainless steel grill, sink and fridge. The helm design is ergonomic with a pair of bolstered seats behind a gray fiberglass instrument panel. Aft, a couch, sun lounges and a tuffet-like seat fairly scream “Italian elan.” And a hidden awning that pulls from the hardtop can shade it all.

For more intimate gatherings, a settee and table are at the bow. This space should be ideal for sun in the afternoon, or for a morning croissant and espresso at anchor, shaded by the removable awning.

Paola Lenti lounges, including a green tuffet, accent the upper deck.

Paola Lenti lounges, including a green tuffet, accent the upper deck.

The Sanlorenzo 86 on sea trial.

The Sanlorenzo 86 on sea trial.

Power for the 86 is a pair of 1,950-horsepower MTU 12V 2000 M94 diesels, giving speeds of 32 knots—and showing that while Sanlorenzo, Jousma and Lowe have created a most delightful yacht, they also haven’t forgotten about performance on the water. (Seriously, forgive the owners: “You have to see her underway!”)

***

“Bellissima”

Paola Lenti is an Italian furniture firm formed by two sisters, with Paola developing the unique weaves and bright colors, and Anna running the business side. The company has built its reputation not just on clever design, but also on having a sense of whimsy in the highest sense of style. Interior designer Marty Lowe, who uses Lenti’s creations on Sanlorenzo models, says, “A tour of their factory is sensory overload, like a candy store I visited as a child.”

Paola Lenti got her start designing rugs before moving into furniture. “I realized something was missing in the market,” she says, “so I began imagining outdoor textiles. Colors are my legacy. For me, colors are instinctual. There are many references to nature, even with the most outrageous colors. Think about walking along the banks of a river in the winter. You see branches and find reds, purples, sandy colors, powder blue. I like things that are timeless.”

Paola Lenti also uses eco-friendly materials, such as woods from sustainable forests and non-toxic finishing treatments.

 

With graceful lines and style pleasing to the eye, Sanlorenzo’s SL86 aims to remain in fashion for years.

With graceful lines and style pleasing to the eye, Sanlorenzo’s SL86 aims to remain in fashion for years.

Vessel Specifications

LOA: 86ft. 9in. (26.45m)
BEAM: 20ft. 10in. (6.35m)
DRAFT: 6ft. 3in. (1.9m)
DISPLACEMENT (full load): 82 tons
CONSTRUCTION: GRP
ENGINES: 2 x 1,950-hp MTU 12V 2000 M94
FUEL: 2,220 gal. (8,400L)
WATER: 450 gal. (1,700L)
SPEED (max.): 32 knots
SPEED (cruise): 27 knots
GUESTS: 8 in 4 staterooms
CREW: 4 in two cabins
BUILDER: Sanlorenzo

For more information: sanlorenzoamericas.com

 

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